Posts Tagged ‘tax on 250’

All $250,000 taxpayers may be the Wrong Target…Too important for such a broad brush.

All $250,000 taxpayers will often be the wrong target if the goal is to rebuild the economy with private sector jobs.

I have served small and medium sized private companies for over 35 years. The proposed tax increase on those so called “wealthiest Americans” is one of those broad brush solutions that will turn out to be counter-productive.

We know that employment is driven primarily by small to medium size privately held companies.  This makes sense.  These are usually owned by someone who lives in the U.S., works in the U.S. and does business primarily in the U.S.  Simply put, most small businesses exist to create a job for their owners and employees.  Contrast this “business purpose” with the purpose of a public company.  Public companies strive to build shareholder value.  Ever increasing pressure to create earnings tends to push labor intensive processes overseas and eliminate jobs through automation.

A study of most business classes will indicate that profit margin (net profit) generally runs between 5% and 10% if the business is profitable.  This category called “small to medium” size will have revenues somewhere between $2 million and $200 million.

Most of these businesses report their income and pay their taxes on the owner’s tax return.  Most of these business owners will tend to take salaries in the low 6 figures….say between $100,000 and $300,000.  Now let’s say that a typical “expanding” business grosses $5 million and nets 5%.  That net is $250,000.  When you add that to the say, $200,000 in salary, you are right in the cross hairs of the president’s proposed tax increase.  What may not be understood is that the $250,000 in profit is not in the owner’s hands.  It is in the business.  These earnings pay for things like new equipment, additional employees, debt principal and owner draws for taxes which are not deductible. 

In the accounting business, we call the $250,000 in my example “pass through” income.  The taxable income is passed to the shareholder’s or partner’s tax return, but the cash generally, is not.  When you tax it, the money has to come out of the company’s working capital leaving fewer dollars for expansion, hiring new employees, etc.

Also, when this “pass through” income is added to the owner’s salary, it is taxed at the owner’s highest rate which will be higher than the corporate rate if the President’s proposal is accepted by Congress.  It should not be taxed at a higher rate than the large corporations pay.  To do so will further cripple our economy.

An Individual who makes $200,000 per year in salary or a couple that makes $250,000 without adding any jobs to the economy probably ought to pay more tax.  But a business that employs people should not be subject to the same level of tax.  Fairness is not at issue here.  Our struggling economy is the issue!  There should probably be some sort of exemption or maximum rate of tax (like the current treatment of capital gains) for business pass through income that will help stimulate job growth in the economy.

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